Tour de force

WooExpert Platinum WooCommerce partner - biggest elephant in the eCommerce room.
Mailchimp Partner Mailchimp partner - you know what’s the newest cutting edge customer experience solution? Great email subject!
Clutch logo Clutch - clients say we’re top dogs in eCommerce. Throw us that stick now.
WordPress Vip WordPress VIP - Enterprise hosting partner

No soup for you!

I can freely say that I’m a Seinfeld fanatic! You know, downloading scripts to catch a punchline, watching bloopers from all 9 seasons, rewatching episodes on TV countless times, getting upset if I miss any of those reruns, using Seinfeld phrases in everyday life…

Listen to this article
1x
0.5x 0.75x 1x 1.25x 1.5x

I can freely say that I’m a Seinfeld fanatic! You know, downloading scripts to catch a punchline, watching bloopers from all 9 seasons, rewatching episodes on TV countless times, getting upset if I miss any of those reruns, using Seinfeld phrases in everyday life…

Phrases like “No soup for you!” from the legendary Soup Nazi. You can imagine my excitement when I saw a commercial for the Acura a few days ago featuring Jerry Seinfeld, with a brief one-and-a-half-second appearance by Larry Thomas with his grumpy face. Seinfeld has gained a few pounds, lost some hair, but still has that “je ne sais quoi.” I still laugh when I see that blank expression.

Acura spent a considerable amount of cash to produce this. The production quality, script, cast, and animations are top-notch. The commercial was specifically made for an event where only the highest level of video production passes muster—the Super Bowl!

The Super Bowl is the culmination of the American football league. It’s a sports event that has long transcended the boundaries of the sport and become part of American popular culture. An innocent observer could easily characterize “Super Bowl Sunday” as a national holiday. Some even argue that it should be because “it unites all Americans regardless of race, religion, or economic class.” On that day, everything revolves around football (the American version, of course).

Let’s get back to the commercial. How is it possible for millions of dollars to be invested in something that lasts for 30 seconds? The answer is simple and expected: viewership. This year’s Super Bowl was watched by over 111 million people, making it the most-watched program in American history! For professionals in the marketing industry, that’s enough information not to question the price of advertising. Super Bowl commercials have evolved into something special, spectacular, and innovative. Viewers eagerly anticipate them because they know they’ll be treated to a dose of great videography and humor. Yes, there is even excitement about commercials!

The late Steve Jobs is rightfully called a revolutionary. Just look at the Super Bowl commercial Apple released back in 1984. Directed by Ridley Scott and with an Orwellian touch, it introduced the world to the Macintosh and is considered a “cult” advertisement. In 1987, Pepsi released its “New Neighbor” commercial featuring Michael J. Fox, playfully challenging the dominance of the Coke ad. This year, Honda created a “Ferris Bueller” sketch that many initially mistook for a trailer for a sequel to the great 80s film. In the end, it turned out to be an ad for Honda’s dubious-looking SUV.

A few numbers to wrap it up. Super Bowl 2012. The average cost of airing an ad was $3.5 million for 30 seconds. The entire airtime was booked as early as October 2011. The Giants defeated the Patriots 21-17.

Bruno Zagorščak
Bruno Zagorščak Neuralab Co-founder and Chief Content Officer

A Boletus aficionado who loves to get lost in the woods. He's still holding dearly to his OG Canon 5DmII while claiming that the play button is the apex call-to-action button on the web.


Subscribe to our quarterly newsletter

Please fill in this field.
Please thick this field to proceed.

Related blog posts